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Success Stories

Kenya Equator6

With the unemployment rates in Kenya hovering around 11% and unemployment among youth (ages 15 – 24) double that at 22.1% - many look to agriculture, construction and extractive sectors for viable employment. However, while many job opportunities exist in Nairobi, there are limited opportunities outside the capital.

MEDA’s Maendeleo Sawa (M-SAWA) project is actively working to combat this statistic by empowering people through private equity investment (PEI) and matching grants.

M-SAWA’s PEI capital has made over $18 million CAD available to SMEs in partnership with the Canadian government. Their matching grant program is currently benefiting 20,000 of these small enterprises – 52% of which are led by women.

Gloria is one such young woman.

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RIHAB

Rihab, a university student in English, her sister Rayan, an anesthesiologist, and their friend Nalhla, an architect, are all graduates of the project’s business and entrepreneurship training program.

Assibi Sumani and her family

Assibi Sumani, a soybean farmer, is married and lives with her husband and five children in northern Ghana. Before Assibi became involved with MEDA’s GROW (Greater Opportunities for Rural Women) project, life had many financial challenges for her family. The couple struggled to pay their children’s school fees and lacked the resources to make basic improvements to their home.

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Ruslan Panchenko, 21, is following his family's farming legacy and has been growing grapes for the past 5 years.

"My father was engaged in grapes initially. He planted a few bushes for himself, but he has no time take care of them," says Ruslan. Growing started as a hobby but soon developed into a passion for the business of grapes. 

Migdonia Nicaragua 2017 83 low resMigdonia Caballero has lived more than 50 years in Guacucal, close to Mombacho Volcano, on the outskirts of Granada. She’s been a farmer since an early age, because her parents were also farmers.

She is a mother of eight adult children, six girls (two of whom are twins) and two boys. She has 11 grandchildren. Migdonia raised her children alone for 10 years after her husband passed away. She’s taught them about farming, through which four of them support their families today.

Owen Pic Best

As part of the MicroLead project, MEDA worked with UGAFODE Microfinance in Uganda to provide a safe and regulated savings environment for their clients.

Owen Mugyerwa has worked at the UGAFODE Lyantonde branch for over a year. While he started as a sales and marketing officer, he now serves as one of the branch’s credit officers. Before working at UGAFODE, Owen worked at both Stanbic and Crane Bank as a contract employee, but he is much more excited about his permanent position at UGAFODE and the security he now has.

Generous Pic Best low resAs part of the MicroLead project, MEDA worked with UGAFODE Microfinance in Uganda to provide a safe and regulated savings environment for their clients.

Generous Atwemerireho has been working at UGAFODE for 12 years. She started straight out of university as a credit officer and has been a branch manager for eight years. She is responsible for UGAFODE’s operations in Lyantonde, one of its largest branches.

Lyantonde was one of four branches selected for the GroupSave product pilot in part due to its strength and size as a branch. The branch currently has 3,050 in active voluntary depositor clients and 1,763 active borrowers.

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As part of the MicroLead project, MEDA worked with UGAFODE Microfinance in Uganda to provide a safe and regulated savings environment for their clients.

Jokas Nuagabe, 34, is a sales and marketing officer at UGAFODE Microfinance Limited. Jokas currently lives in Kampala with his wife, Gloria, and two children. Jokas was born in Ntungamo and moved to Kampala 10 years ago to work in commercial banking.

One year ago, Jokas made the shift to microfinance and UGAFODE. He is the savings supervisor and a key member of the team developing and launching UGAFODE’s savings product for informal savings groups called GroupSave.

Mugagga Sekyanzi Best Pic low res

As part of the MicroLead project, MEDA worked with UGAFODE Microfinance in Uganda to provide a safe and regulated savings environment for their clients.

Mugagga Sekyanzi, 26, is a born entrepreneur. Beginning with his organic sugar business at age 13, he has invested and reinvested his experiences and resources into the business he manages today, Mugagga Industries Uganda Ltd.

As part of the MicroLead project, MEDA worked with UGAFODE Microfinance in Uganda to provide a safe and regulated savings environment for their clients.

Kagadi Boda SG Best pic2 smallKagadi United, a group of 22 boda boda (motorcycle) drivers in Uganda, was created when it joined UGAFODE Microfinance two years ago. For many members, UGAFODE has been the first bank they have ever interacted with. The group has been dedicated to saving as a group, meeting weekly, and transferring the money to their joint account.

Ato Solomon is a processor in Woreta town, in a village called Menhar. His residence is located next to his business site.

He has been in business, collecting grains and selling to processors, for 15 years. Since 2007, he established his own processing business and engaged in grain processing—focusing on rice. In addition to rice, he processes and wholesales oats and rough peas. He has two rice de-hauling/polishing machines and four employees.

amanduAsetu Tipeani Amadu, is a soybean farmer and the lead farmer of her group in the Nyoli community of Wa West District in MEDA’s GROW project.

GROW DancingAnd in the villages they dance with joy. We were honored again and again with music and dance and clapping and singing. We were thanked for coming to see them and for being supporters. And we brought Mary Fehr and Sarah French, who cycled across Canada last summer as part of Bike to GROW to raise money for them and other women like them in the GROW project.

Ghana Lead FarmersThis group of a village’s lead farmers don’t have to be coaxed to come forward!

The upper Wa Valley, where GROW works, has over 1,000 lead farmers. Some were chosen for their farming/leadership ability; some came forward when they heard of an opportunity to do something new.

Mary BabeleThis is Mary Babele from Tendoma, one of GROW’s lead farmers. Is there any question that this woman is confident? Look at her stance. Not only is she a lead farmer – she is a Ghana soybean farmer of the year!

MandelaThis is Mandela. He is from one of MEDA KFPs – key facilitating partners – a fancy name for the local organizations that provide the bulk of the interface and training between MEDA and their clients.