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Sarona - Values Report 2017

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

Sarona - Values Report 2017

Values Reports

We believe that applying ethical, social and environmental values to each investment decision builds a better world and helps us generate attractive returns for our investors.

We strive to influence the investment industry to incorporate best practices and work with fund managers and investee companies to improve their Environmental, Social, Governance & Impact (ESG&I) performance. To report on our progress, since 2012, we have been publishing an annual Values Report.

In the 2017 Values Report, we consolidated the data on 22 IRIS metrics, measuring the impact of over 200 of our portfolio companies across more than 50 countries in Frontier and Emerging Markets. We also included 11 case studies that provide a window into how our capital is creating impact on the ground.

We recognize the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a universal framework for sustainable development.  So this year, we mapped each of our 200+ investee companies’ alignment with the individual Goals and found that we are most closely aligned with Goal 5 (Gender Equality), Goal 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) and Goal 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions). We will work with other stakeholders to establish and adopt common SDG measurement and reporting methodology.

In June 2017, Sarona signed the Stockholm Declaration alongside leading European investors and government entities, representing over $200bn AUM. Co-led by the UN Global Compact and GRI, and supported by UNPRI, this initiative represents a first-of-its-kind commitment by private and public sector players to work together on setting measurement and reporting standards for the SDGs.

Here is a snapshot of the impacts Sarona’s companies achieved in 2016:

  • Companies employed 127,000+ people, 27% of whom were women; the vast majority of the companies provide high-quality jobs, benefits and working conditions
  • 85 million people benefitted from our companies’ activities
  • 100% of the companies are in full compliance with local labour, tax and environmental regulations
  • Two-thirds of the companies have an official policy documenting their commitment to the environment

Greater Rural Opportunities for Women – Market Actor Case Study – February 2017

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

Greater Rural Opportunities for Women – Market Actor Case Study – February 2017

“There is no tool for development more effective than the empowerment of women.”
- Kofi Annan

These words spoken by former Secretary General Kofi Annan, in his opening remarks at the UN commission on the Status of Women, are among the main goals envisioned in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals endorsed by heads of state and government, and high representatives at the United Nations. This goal is shared by many NGOs in the developing world, including MEDA, whose mission is to create business solutions to poverty.

Business opportunities for women require collaboration with various market and value chain actors. In the GROW context, this looks like moving products from input suppliers to farmers, who then produce with access to extension, technology, information, transport and other support services offered by the private sector. From there, the end product is delivered to the end customer. Therefore, the relationship between and among market players, especially between farmers, agribusinesses, and buyers are crucially important in facilitating a productive market system.

The implementation of the GROW project started in 2013 with a goal of reaching 20,000 women farmers using a value chain approach. Through a mixed methods approach including interviews and surveys, this case study examines the role of these market actors and their productivity as they have engaged with the GROW project and female farmers. The results will help MEDA to learn about the impact it is making in this market system, and will be shared with partners.

UHDP Most Significant Change Stories (Ukraine)

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

UHDP Most Significant Change Stories (Ukraine)

The Ukraine Horticulture Development Project (UHDP) assists farmers to adopt modern technologies, increase productivity and deliver premium quality greenhouse crops, berries and table grapes to markets in which they have a competitive advantage.

In its final year of operation, UHDP has assisted over 6,587 direct farmers with more than 3,750 participating in six clustered geographic locations. The project uses market consolidation to encourage small farmers to work together to better reach valuable markets. In 2013, over 2,600 UHDP farmers generated 11 metric tons of greenhouse and horticulture crops worth $10.5 million, which they sold to national food retail chains and exported to Russia. About 40% of project clients are women. Agro Capital Management has conducted new farm equipment sales valued at $5 million sold to 737 small farmers, 36% of which are women.

EDGET Rice Parboiling Case Study

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

EDGET Rice Parboiling Case Study
This report is one of two evaluative case studies focused on the EDGET Project,developed towards the end of the project to assess the changes and benefits of MEDA’s rice value chain interventions to learn from and strengthen them for future interventions. This report explores rice parboiling technology used to leverage rice production and value addition, especially for women.

Growing Entrepreneurs: Ethiopian Stories of Change

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

Growing Entrepreneurs: Ethiopian Stories of Change
About EDGET

Ethiopians Driving Growth, Entrepreneurship and Trade (EDGET) is a five-year value chain development project funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC). The project aimed to increase incomes for 10,000 men and women farmers and textile producers by facilitating access to growing markets, enhancing production techniques and appropriate technologies, and improving input supplies and affordable support services, including finance.

EDGET, which means ‘progress’ in the Amharic language, has been concentrated on integrating smallholder rice farmers and small-scale artisans into higher value markets through increased market linkages and enhanced productivity. As a result of the project, Ethiopian rice and textile entrepreneurs are producing highquality products and reaching new and growing markets to drive growth and improve livelihoods.

Growing Entrepreneurs: Ethiopian Stories of Change

Each farmer, weaver and value chain actor that EDGET worked with and supported throughout the life of the project has a unique story of change and transformation. Throughout the project, a total of 75 stories were collected, of which 17 were tracked as long-term stories. This collection features both long-term and single stories, telling the story of EDGET through the lens of 12 individuals across the textile and rice value chains and different geographic locations. They shared what their lives were like before participating in EDGET, the kinds of changes they experienced during the project, and their plans to expand their businesses.

For optimal viewing, download the PDF and view on your desktop.

Business Case for Serving Youth

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

Business Case for Serving Youth

This is the final of six in MEDA’s ‘YouthInvest Praxis Series’ - a group of reflective publications developed over the course of the YouthInvest (YI) project in Morocco and Egypt to assess the impact of MEDA’s interventions in order to learn from and strengthen them.

In this document, MEDA builds the business case for MFIs to serve youth more actively with either existing or new youth-tailored loans by demonstrating that youth represent a viable market for the MFIs. The four drivers that can guide MFIs to serve youth sustainably are: operational profitability, portfolio quality, cost of serving youth, and cross-selling potential.

 

 

 

 


Click here for more MEDA Youth Economic Opportunities publications.