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Aug
15

Measuring what matters in smallholder agriculture: Key takeaways from ‘Lean Impact for Ag’

INNOVATE project clients in Malawi

Why does measurement and the type of metrics we use matter? In a rapidly changing and complex world, we need to leverage data-driven insights to prove our approaches and programs create lasting impact for the clients we serve.

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Sep
20

Green Finance: to bravely go where no-one has gone before…

b2ap3_large_GreenFinanceMedazine MEDA

Just like Captain Kirk, we are on a journey of discovery.

Individuals, communities, cities, countries, businesses and organizations are heading into uncharted territory - making brave and unique decisions to combat global environmental challenges.

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Aug
11

High Commission of Canada Visits GROW

bibeauedit1Ghana has emerged as one of Africa’s economic success stories, with steady economic growth in its agriculture and mining sectors.

Ghana and Canada have had a long and prosperous relationship, with Ghana being one of the first nations in Africa to establish diplomatic ties with Canada. 

On July 8, 2017, MEDA’s Greater Rural Opportunities for Women (GROW) project in Ghana was pleased to welcome the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Development and La Francophonie to view GROW and share information on the challenges faced by women and girls in remote northern areas of the country.

 

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Dec
01

Arriving in Ghana

Accra from Jamestown Lighthouse

 

A view of Accra taken from Jamestown Lighthouse

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Aug
14

Culture of cycling

b2ap3_thumbnail_bike-to-grow-blog-post MEDA
We are currently in Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, 100km away from Quebec City. We are camping and I’m lying outside on my towel trying to digest all the food I just ate (Now I can eat almost anything, at any time). There is a married couple at the campground in front of ours. They cycled here too. There are in their 80s. The cycling culture is huge in Quebec. Yesterday we did 150km and people were cycling beside us screaming enthusiastically in French. There are pathways that seem like highways throughout Quebec. They are called the Green Route. It has been so incredibly beautiful. We took the Route 5 into Montreal a few days ago. A group of MEDA members were nice enough to come meet us 80km out and cycle with us into the city. They definitely exposed us to some amazing routes. We took a ferry and crossed over to Oka where we rode on a bike path the whole way into Montreal. In Montreal there are many cyclists, and for the first time, with our day off, we cycled around the city. There are bike paths everywhere and everyone cycles to commute or to work out.

It truly was a wonderful experience. Here’s why: Usually we cycle on the road because they are paved; however, Google maps tries to take us on bike routes, which end up being sand and/or gravel. It doesn’t sound like a bad route, and it’s not, but if you have 28inch tires then you end up doing 20km in two hours. This is not advantageous, because we can usually get up to 35km an hour. So based on previous experiences, we avoided any type of trail. Now that we are in Quebec, we are spoiled rotten. Not only has the route been nice, but the architecture is so different here. I really enjoy going through small towns and seeing the churches and colorful tin rooftops. Did I happen to mention that since we’ve entered Quebec we have been cycling along le Fleuve, the St. Lawrence River. Today we stopped to enjoy the beautiful little islands and to look at the mountains on the North shore. Tomorrow we arrive at Riviere-du-Loup (Wolf River). National Geographic describes it as having the second most beautiful sunset in the world.
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Jul
27

The Northern Myth

This past week and a half I took holiday to attend weddings, and it was great to catch up with everyone from back home. I come from a small town, so I received numerous questions about the bike trip. Some examples include: “What is your average km per day?” “What were the biggest challenges you faced?” “Where do you go to the washroom?” “Have you seen any wildlife?” Presumptions also arise, “The Prairies are flat,” “Northern Ontario is desolate,” “You must have a support vehicle.”

It’s surprising the angst I had before this trip. One example is how scared I was of Northern Ontario before, and during, the trip up until arriving in the province. I was scared that we wouldn’t find towns, cafes, or any sort of food. Bears, wolves, and moose petrified me. I thought we would be cycling for days without seeing people. I was utterly and completely wrong.

Northern Ontario has been my favorite part of this trip and created many dear memories. I am a proud Canadian and extremely proud to now say I am from Ontario. Coming from the Sandbanks, I personally believed I was spoiled, and I am, but there are many more beaches across Ontario. In Terrace Bay we set up our tents on the beach and swam in Lake Superior. In White River, where Winnie the Pooh originated, we took a five-hour break from cycling to enjoy the sandy beach of White Lake Provincial Park. In Marathon, we camped right on the water. The beauty of Tobermory shocks me. I have pictures on social media, and its beauty blows everyone away. It is a gorgeous, turquoise area on Lake Ontario with caves and cliff jumping. What’s more surprising is that I never knew of Tobermory even though it isn’t that far from me. It took us a month to get across Northern Ontario, and WE ARE STILL HERE. The majority of the time we camped along beaches like these.

There have been a few milestones on this trip: finishing the Rockies, going over Summits, and detouring to Saskatoon, among others. One milestone that was extremely important was arriving in Thunder Bay. This is the halfway mark across Canada, as well as where Terry Fox decided to end his run to fight cancer. When we went to the monument, overlooking the sleeping giant, I was deeply touched and felt a wave of emotions. I had goose bumps on my arms. What Terry Fox did was extraordinary, and I am only getting a glimpse of his trip from this ride. I felt like crying because I was so overwhelmed with emotions standing there and looking at the statue. Another epic achievement for me was going across the Che Cheman Ferry from Manitoulin Island to Tobermory. This signified that the hardest parts of the trip were over, conquering the mountains, facing headwinds (sometimes for days) in the Prairies, and going through the hilly Canadian Shield in Northern Ontario. We took the night ferry at 10pm so that we were able to stay outside and look at the stars while we talked about our accomplishments and how surreal it was that we had made it this far. Now we are headed out East, and there is less than a month left of the trip.

I look forward to its beauty, and I recommend all Ontarians, and the rest of Canadians, to visit North West Ontario and take your time to see it.

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