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Clara Yoon is a project manager at MEDA, her primary role is managing INNOVATE, an IDRC-funded initiative focused on testing and learning about the intersection of non-traditional finance and innovation adoption by smallholders. Her areas of focus include women’s financial inclusion, digital finance, and ICT for development. She is an advocate for leveraging user-centered research and design to tackle today's pressing global development challenges. Clara holds a MA in Global Governance from the University of Waterloo and BA in Global Studies from Wilfrid Laurier University. She has prior experience in South Korea, working with a local human rights non-governmental organization that promotes and advocates for the North Korean human rights agenda.
Aug
15

Measuring what matters in smallholder agriculture: Key takeaways from ‘Lean Impact for Ag’

INNOVATE project clients in Malawi

Why does measurement and the type of metrics we use matter? In a rapidly changing and complex world, we need to leverage data-driven insights to prove our approaches and programs create lasting impact for the clients we serve.

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Jun
27

Experimentation in smallholder agriculture: A key takeaway from ‘lean impact for Ag’

 INNOVATE

How can we leverage learning and experimentation to better design agricultural innovations for smallholders? A ‘lean approach’ to testing and learning from pilots, demos, and other experimental methods can help validate assumptions with potential users before committing to costly interventions with low adoption or unintended consequences.

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Nov
27

The Future of Women’s Financial Inclusion: Three Key Takeaways from #MFWW2017

wwb 01croppedDesigning for Behaviour Change panel Last month, I had an amazing opportunity to attend the Women's World Banking 2017 Making Finance Work for Women Summit (MFWW). Over 300 participants gathered in Dar es Salaam from across the African continent and the globe, representing various organizations, institutions, and firms, to engage and deliberate on key trends, topics, opportunities and challenges concerning women's financial inclusion. I was inspired by the speakers and panelists who shared their stories, insight and vision for the future of women's financial inclusion.

In this post, I want to share three key takeaways I have reflected on after returning from the Summit. My hope is that they give a glimpse of the event and speak to my own learning about the state of women's financial inclusion and what the future may hold.

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Sep
25

A New Era of Farming: Unlocking Innovations for Smallholders Via Non-Traditional Finance

b2ap3_medium_Ethiopiafarmer-Nov2014-786ClaraYoon MEDA

 

 This post was originally published on Next Billion

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Mar
16

"Poquito a Poco: Little by Little" – how blended finance facilitates change for low-income and rural households

As MEDA's flagship blended finance program, INFRONT (Impact Investing in Frontier Markets), is in its final year of implementation, the team is focusing its efforts on dissemination and learning. We recently launched two exciting media and communications products to showcase how the project is having an impact in frontier and emerging markets through a combination of investment and technical assistance. This blog will focus on a short film that was created, that features a portfolio company based on Colombia, Rayco and describe the following aspects of the film initiative: process, partner, and promotion.

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Last summer the INFRONT team started working with Twice Upon A Time to produce two short documentary films featuring Rayco and Maureauto Colombia, two companies based in Colombia that received a Sustainability Innovation Grant through the INFRONT project. The goal of these two films is to create awareness, generate empathy and present the business case of sustainability and environment, social, and governance (ESG) practices.

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Mar
14

Growing Entrepreneurs, Growing Opportunities for Generations to Come

Ethiopian Fabric
Werkinish Ethiopia

“I never thought that these kind of days would come for me and my daughter. I never thought weaving would change our lives like this!” – Werkinesh Wade

MEDA launched its first project in Ethiopia in December 2010, Ethiopians Driving Growth through Trade and Entrepreneurship (EDGET), a rice and textile value chain project funded by Global Affairs Canada. The project aimed to increase incomes for 10,000 men and women farmers and textile producers in three regions of Ethiopia: Amhara, Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region, and Addis Ababa. EDGET, which means ‘progress’ in the Amharic language, concentrated on integrating smallholder rice farmers and textile artisans into high value markets through increased market linkages and enhanced productivity.

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Jan
23

A trip to the ocean, a time to reflect

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In Ethiopia, Christmas is celebrated at the beginning of January, because of the Orthodox Calendar. While Steph and I could have had two Christmases, we took a trip to Mombasa, Kenya to take advantage of our extended holiday. I'm not really the spontaneous type – but it was a worthwhile and refreshing trip. We planned it pretty last minute, but in the end, everything worked out and we had many good memories.

Mombasa is a coastal city on the Indian Ocean and is the second largest city in Kenya. Historically it was a vital port city for trade. We had to adjust quickly to a new language (Swahili), currency (Kenyan Shillings), transportation (Kenyans drive on the other side of the road) and so on. Our first time in one of the grocery stores was eye-opening. There was much more variety and selection compared to what's available in Addis. We were also very excited about the nice cafes, restaurants, and the mall in Nyali. From a development perspective, I began to notice quickly the differences between Ethiopia and Kenya. Ethiopia follows a state-led development model, and the government protects the economy from foreign franchises. Kenya, on the other hand, has scaled back the role of the state, liberalized markets and embraced a Western model of development.

Our time in Mombasa was short and sweet. We didn't travel around too much, but mainly relaxed by the beach, ate food we can't find in Addis, and spent time getting to know the guests at our hostel. Our stay at the hostel was pretty unique. The owner recently moved into the current house a few months ago, so it didn't feel like home yet and was missing her personal touches. We were there when artwork, curtains, and the like were being put up. To see her and express that she was coming alive again, was something that excited me. I'm all for pursuing things, opportunities and people in life that make you come alive. Of course we all go through different seasons, some much more difficult than others. But ensuring that there's life in what you do, is vital.

During our trip, I was reading a book called "The Me I Want To Be" by John Ortberg. It's a timely read, because I've experienced many challenges, opportunities to grow and self-discover throughout this internship. If there's one thing that I realized recently, it's this: for some time I got lost in questions and uncertainty about the future, which made me doubt my dreams, passions and capabilities. It's a downward spiral if you don't quickly realize there's a process to figuring it all out. And answers don't always come quickly or conveniently. Being confident and certain in who I am in my faith in the Lord, regardless of circumstances, is what will keep me grounded. A quote from the book that I love is this, "life is not about any particular achievement or experience. The most important task of your life is not what you do, but who you become."

It's already nearing the end of January, which means I have less than two months left. It feels like there isn't enough time to get everything done, so it's crunch time! I'm excited to go to the field next week and spend time collecting most significant change (MSC) stories from our clients. My sister wrote in her Christmas card to me: "There's no CAP to what you can learn there." I want to hold onto this. Each day, there are new things to learn from different people, opportunities, and situations. There is no cap!

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