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Everence researcher engages companies in social change

2 minute read

Chris Meyer dreams big dreams.

“I would love to see our global financial system be transformed into a more sustainable structure that accounts for the human and environmental impacts of our economy, not just the short-term financial effort,” says the Ohio man, who works as manager of stewardship investing research and advocacy for Everence Financial/Praxis Mutual Funds. “I hope to be part of that transformation.”

4 minute read

GOSHEN, IND — Investors who believe that the bottom line should include considerations of people and planet, as well as profit, have often fallen into one of two camps.

MEDA support helps Ecolodge provide employment for Bedouin community

5 minute read

Dana Biosphere Reserve, Jordan
Making a living in southern Jordan’s remote desert is not an easy task.
The Feynan Ecolodge, an environmentally-friendly tourist destination in a nature reserve, makes that a lot easier for people who live here.
At least 80 families, a total of 400 people, benefit directly or indirectly from the off-the-grid EcoLodge, whose 26 rooms can accommodate 60 guests.

Back Cover MkPL March2019

 

 ©2017, Saskatchewan Health Authority

Put the words Equality and Equity into your favorite web browser, and you are likely to find a range of images, some of them highly controversial,  depicting the difference between the two concepts.
Giving people the same tools or support when their life circumstances are different will result in varied outcomes, as the graphic above demonstrates.

Sidebar to Sam's Place article. From the March 2019 issue of The Marketplace magazine

By John Longhurst

We handle it every day, so we never think about how challenging our colorful money looks to non-Canadians.
Arshdeep Kaur knows.
The 23-year-old immigrated to Canada from India last summer with plans to attend college in fall.

Coffee shop provides youth with skills to become employable

By John Longhurst

Winnipeg, Man — It’s the morning lull at Sam’s Place, the time between the opening rush for coffee and the lunch crowd.
There are about a half-dozen people in the coffee shop, café and used bookstore — two women having a meeting, a student doing some studying, one or two people browsing the books, a mother and child playing in the games area at the back.
At the counter is Rachel Braun, making a coffee for a customer. The 14-year-old isn’t an employee. She’s a volunteer.

Former tech executive urges students to take values-based approach to business.

By Mike Strathdee

Christians in business must realize that achieving success is only the first of two important journeys in life, says the former chief operating officer of the company that created the smart phone.
Life’s first journey is building a career and becoming a growth junkie, committed to life-long learning, Don Morrison said in a speech to students at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, ON.

Economic development programs that focus on women’s needs can have a major positive impact on the lives of the clients, their families and their communities.
So says Su Sandar Koe, who works as gender co-ordinator for MEDA’s Improving Market Opportunities for Women (IMOW) project in Myanmar. While most economic development programs are not women focussed, IMOW is.

Improving the lives of vulnerable populations so that all people may experience God’s love sometimes requires moves to seek equity rather than just equality.
Achieving equity may require understanding of, and consideration of the concept of intersectionality.

Land tenure is a critical issue in efforts to build equity, MEDA discovered during its Greater Rural Opportunities for Women (GROW) project in Ghana. Land tenure “underpinned women’s ability to participate in agriculture, their agricultural productivity… and ultimately, their income.”
Women are far from being treated as equals in Ghana.

Improving women’s empowerment in a systemic way requires meaningfully engaging men in gender equity strategies.
During the Greater Opportunities for Rural Women (GROW) project in Ghana, MEDA realized it needed to engage men beyond their role as gatekeepers, turning them into allies in gender awareness raising. It also needed to ensure that men did not feel left behind by development efforts.

Jordanian woman becomes an entrepreneur with her husband's support

As Published in The Marketplace Magazine

By Dara Al Masri
My husband was my first customer”, says Intisar, a food entrepreneur selling pickles in an impoverished area in Jordan’s Balqa governorate, northwest of Amman.
To get to where she is today, Intisar had to get past a few barriers that usually stop women from entering the business world in Jordan. “I wanted to do something beneficial with my time,” says the 39-year-old mother of four.

Members of environment committee learn about the challenges facing farmer clients

By Dennis Tessier and Salihu Samuel Wamdeo
(Editor’s note: Several MEDA offices have Green Teams, volunteers who work on ways for the organization to be as environmentally responsible as possible.)
The Nigeria Green Team is an ambitious bunch. Most MEDA Nigeria staff have joined the team. They have started an office compost, plastic recycling program and a garden producing everything from passion fruit, tomatoes and hot chillies to groundnuts (peanuts).

B.C. event planner handles behind the scenes tasks at MEDA conventions

Ann-Michele Ewert works hard to be low-profile.
Not that the gregarious event planner is unhappy to chat.
It’s just that Ewert, who has helped organize MEDA’s annual Business as A Calling convention for 20 years, measures success by how well she can blend in. “If you do your job well, people don’t notice,” she says.

By Jeanne Bernick, KCoe Isom
Ask any consumer at the grocery store today what the average American farmer looks like, and the typical answer is: “A white male in his 50s.” While it’s true the average age of the American farmer is 58, according to USDA, if you dig more deeply you’ll find some surprising developments.
Women in Farming — By the
Numbers and Tasks
The number of women farmers has tripled since the 1970s. Now, according to the US Department of Agriculture, women make up just under one third of all farmers. More than a third of farm ground is owned by women and 62.7 million acres are farmed by women principal operators, according to the last US Census of Agriculture.

Manitoba farm boy beats the odds to
become a professional race car driver

As Published in The Marketplace magazine

David Richert finds it easy to connect his racing career with his Christian faith.
Given the odds against him succeeding in professional auto racing, he has no other explanation for the past 16 years.Richert animatedDavid Richert is passionate about racing as a calling

“Racing and God intersected with each other, in the sense that God used racing as a tool for me to have an opportunity to experience him for myself, and how he operates in the world around me,” Richert told an audience who attended a workshop about his life story at MEDA’s annual Business as a Calling convention.

As a child who grew up collecting eggs on his family’s farm south of Winnipeg, Man., he had no interest in motorized vehicles. When he finally discovered racing at the age of 20, he was told that he was both too old and too tall to be a race car driver.