Folder GROW - Greater Rural Opportunities for Women

Greater Rural Opportunities for Women (GROW) / Meilleures opportunités pour les agricultrices

Greater Rural Opportunities for Women (GROW) / Meilleures opportunités pour les agricultrices

GROW, made possible with the generous support of Global Affairs Canada and implemented by Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA), promotes women’s economic empowerment in Northern Ghana. GROW strives for improved sustainable food security for smallholder farming families, particularly among women.

In 2017, 17,779 farmers harvested 7,740 hectares of soybean, yielding 7,169 MT of the legume. Of that, 4,940 MT were sold, 1,513 MT were kept for consumption, and 546 MT were saved as seed. GROW farmers earned 6.4 million Ghana cedis (1.9 million CAD) from their soybean sales. Five years ago, only 15% of women had enough food to last 12 months of the year, now 51% have enough to meet their household’s needs all year. Nearly all households (96%) now include soybean in their diet.


Rendu possible par le soutien généreux d’Affaires mondiales Canada et mis en oeuvre par Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA), GROW favorise l’autonomisation économique des femmes dans le nord du Ghana. GROW s’efforce d’améliorer la sécurité alimentaire durable pour les petites exploitations agricoles, en particulier chez les femmes.

En 2017, 17 779 agriculteurs ont récolté 7 740 hectares de soja, ce qui représente 7 169 tonnes métriques de légumineuses. De ce nombre, 4 940 tonnes ont été vendues, 1 513 ont été conservées pour la consommation et 546 ont été mises de côté à titre de semences. Les agricultrices et agriculteurs de GROW ont gagné 6,4 millions de cedis ghanéens (1,9 million CAD) de leurs ventes de soja. Il y a cinq ans, seulement 15 % des femmes avaient assez de nourriture pour les 12 mois de l’année, maintenant 51 % en ont assez pour répondre en permanence aux besoins de leur ménage. Presque tous les ménages (96 %) incluent maintenant le soja dans leur alimentation.

Greater Rural Opportunities for Women – Market Actor Case Study – February 2017

Tagged in Monitoring and Impact Measurement

Greater Rural Opportunities for Women – Market Actor Case Study – February 2017

“There is no tool for development more effective than the empowerment of women.”
- Kofi Annan

These words spoken by former Secretary General Kofi Annan, in his opening remarks at the UN commission on the Status of Women, are among the main goals envisioned in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals endorsed by heads of state and government, and high representatives at the United Nations. This goal is shared by many NGOs in the developing world, including MEDA, whose mission is to create business solutions to poverty.

Business opportunities for women require collaboration with various market and value chain actors. In the GROW context, this looks like moving products from input suppliers to farmers, who then produce with access to extension, technology, information, transport and other support services offered by the private sector. From there, the end product is delivered to the end customer. Therefore, the relationship between and among market players, especially between farmers, agribusinesses, and buyers are crucially important in facilitating a productive market system.

The implementation of the GROW project started in 2013 with a goal of reaching 20,000 women farmers using a value chain approach. Through a mixed methods approach including interviews and surveys, this case study examines the role of these market actors and their productivity as they have engaged with the GROW project and female farmers. The results will help MEDA to learn about the impact it is making in this market system, and will be shared with partners.

How To Build A Keyhole Garden

Tagged in Environment and Climate Change

How To Build A Keyhole Garden

What is a keyhole garden?

It is a circular shaped garden with a compost basket built at the centre and a small depression towards the centre that al-lows for easy access to the basket and gives the garden a keyhole shape when viewed from above.

The garden uses a number of layers to retain moisture and nourish the soil and the composting basket replenishes the soil's nutrients as well. The garden is made from materials that are locally available at relatively low or no cost.

This document explains how to build your own keyhole garden, complete with pictures.

How to build your keyhole garden…

Tagged in Environment and Climate Change

How to build your keyhole garden…
A pictorial guide for the urban gardens project on how to build a keyhole garden. a pictorial guide for the urban gardens project

Increasing Women's Access to Land: Advancing the Conversation

Tagged in Gender, Ghana

Increasing Women's Access to Land: Advancing the Conversation
"Increasing Women's Access to Land: Advancing the Conversation" provides insight into the on-going issue of land tenure for women in Ghana. Secure access to land and land ownership for women is vitally important for farmers, including those whom the GROW project works with in Ghana's Upper West Region. Many studies have shown that land ownership and improved access to land for women can increase food security and protect natural resources. On November 18, 2017, GROW will be hosting a land tenure forum in Wa, Ghana to inform communities and begin developing strategies on land tenure for Ghanaian women. Read more about this exciting event and how GROW is working to advance the conversation on land access.

Women-owned Keyhole Gardens: An opportunity to strengthen household food security in Ghana

Tagged in Environment and Climate Change

Women-owned Keyhole Gardens: An opportunity to strengthen household food security in Ghana
Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA) implemented a pilot to extend the growing season for female farmers with the ultimate goal of contributing towards improved food security for women and their families in Northwestern Ghana. Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the project tested two water catchment, storage and irrigations systems: ferro-cement tanks and keyhole gardens. MEDA completed an evaluation of these technologies in February 2015.