Folder Afghan Secure Futures

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) - Indirect Approaches to Youth Economic Development

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) - Indirect Approaches to Youth Economic Development

This report draws on the experience of the Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) project to highlight several important technical considerations when employing indirect programming approaches to reach vulnerable youth. Its intended audiences are implementers and donors who are developing programming for vulnerable children and youth and considering entry points for interventions or pathways for economic inclusion. The report discusses each finding in turn and then presents conclusions.

ASF operated from 2008 to 2011 with a budget of $2.9 million. Implemented by Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA) and managed by FHI 360, the ASF project focused on improving the lives of as many as 1,000 vulnerable boys, mainly between the ages of 14 and 18, who were living in Kabul and working as apprentices in the construction sector. The project took an indirect approach to generating economic benefits for youth apprentices by focusing its economic interventions on the workshop owners that employ apprentices.

ASF was one of four field projects of the STRIVE program, managed by FHI 360 in partnership with Action for Enterprise (AFE), ACDI/VOCA, MEDA, Save the Children, the IRIS Center at the University of Maryland and USAID/DCOF. STRIVE implemented four field projects in Africa and Asia between 2008 and 2013. Each project pursued a unique economic strengthening approach, ranging from savings-led finance to workforce development to value chain interventions. Coupled with a robust monitoring and evaluation framework and learning strategy, STRIVE tracked and documented the impacts of these diverse interventions on child-level indicators related to both economic (financial), and non-economic (health, education, nutrition, etc.) vulnerability factors. As a result, STRIVE has sought to identify and demonstrate interventions that can sustainably increase household incomes and/or assets and document how such increases improve (or fail to improve) the lives of children.

This FIELD Report summarizes the findings of one of the STRIVE projects, MEDA’s Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) project, on using an indirect approach to reach and benefit youth in Afghanistan. It finds that indirect approaches can create both economic and social benefits for youth and that many questions remain on how to implement indirect approaches most effectively.

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) - Leveraging Apprenticeships

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) - Leveraging Apprenticeships

Series: STRIVE for Learning Series

Organization(s): MEDA, FHI 360

Institution(s): USAID Displaced Children & Orphans Fund

Date Published: December, 2013

This report draws from the experience of the Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) project to highlight several important technical considerations when leveraging apprenticeships to reach vulnerable youth. Its intended audiences are implementers and donors who are developing programming for vulnerable children and youth considering entry points for interventions or pathways for economic inclusion. It summarizes findings from using an apprenticeship model to improve economic opportunities for vulnerable youth in Afghanistan.

ASF was one of five country programs implemented under the STRIVE program, funded by the USAID Displaced Children and Orphans Fund, in close collaboration with the USAID Microenterprise Development office cooperative agreement. STRIVE is an Associate Award under the FIELD-Support LWA.

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF): LWA STRIVE Project Activity Brief

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF): LWA STRIVE Project Activity Brief

Series: STRIVE for Learning Series

Organization(s): MEDA, FHI 360

Institution(s): USAID Displaced Children & Orphans Fund

Date Published: April 1, 2012

An activity under STRIVE, the Afghanistan Secure Futures (ASF) initiative enhanced economic opportunities for youth in Afghanistan by targeting youth apprentices. The program had two key components: increase the number and diversity of contracts for enterprises—primarily workshops in the construction sector—who employ youth apprentices, and improve working conditions and learning opportunities for those youth. The latter included a critical literacy training component as well as a workplace safety component.

Over the course of the 3 years, ASF reached 353 workshops and 1,080 youth apprentices, with approximately one-third of these receiving multiple ASF interventions. ASF’s role in supporting workshop owners—were awarded contracts totaling US$2.2 million–to secure contracts included: providing training; facilitating contacts between workshops and contractors; and connecting workshop owners to each other, facilitating the process of subcontracting, or joint bids by multiple workshops.

This STRIVE for Learning Activity Brief outlines the program's key approaches, methods, and outputs.

ASF was one of five country programs implemented under the STRIVE program, funded by the USAID Displaced Children and Orphans Fund, in close collaboration with the USAID Microenterprise Development office cooperative agreement. STRIVE is an Associate Award under the FIELD-Support LWA.

As published online at http://microlinks.kdid.org/library/strive-activity-brief-1-afghan-secure-futures-asf-project

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF): So What? Afghanistan - Securing a stake for youth

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF): So What? Afghanistan - Securing a stake for youth
Welcome to So What?, a periodic look at MEDA's long-term impact around the world. What really changed as a result of our development efforts? What got better for families and communities? This issue looks at the Afghan Secure Futures project: "Afghanistan - Securing a stake for youth."

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF): Supplementary Literacy and Numeracy for Apprentices

Afghan Secure Futures (ASF): Supplementary Literacy and Numeracy for Apprentices
This report summarizes the findings of MEDA's Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) project in facilitating access to supplementary literacy and numeracy training for vulnerable youth in Afghanistan as part of a market-based project. First, the report finds that non-formal literacy classes can attract vulnerable youth who are unable to attend school. Second, establishing trust with workshop owners through business-related interventions can build their acceptance of initiatives such as supplementary classes for apprentices, where benefits to the business may not be immediately apparent. Third, there is greater receptivity to supplementary classes if their commercial benefits are made clear from the outset. Fourth, data collected over the course of the project suggest positive impacts for apprentices and workshop owners. Finally, independent of public funding, creating a sustainable system for supplementary classes that reaches working youth is a challenge.

ASF was one of five country programs implemented under the STRIVE program, funded by the USAID Displaced Children and Orphans Fund, in close collaboration with the USAID Microenterprise Development office cooperative agreement. STRIVE is an Associate Award under the FIELD-Support LWA.

The Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) Project - STRIVE Activity Brief

The Afghan Secure Futures (ASF) Project - STRIVE Activity Brief

Organization(s): FHI 360, MEDA

Institution(s): United States Agency for International Development

Date Published: January 1, 2012

Although there have been some economic gains in recent years, most Afghans continue to struggle financially, and an estimated 90 percent of Afghan families rely on informal employment to support themselves. Young people from poor families are generally unable to afford costs associated with formal schooling, which places them at a disadvantage when seeking to enter the workforce. In response, the Afghanistan Secure Futures (ASF) project has engaged youth apprentices and informal sector small enterprises, in order to improve economic opportunities for vulnerable children and youth apprenticed in small workshops in the construction trade. The activity was implemented by MEDA (Mennonite Economic Development Associates) under the STRIVE program managed by FHI 360, with funding from USAID’s Displaced Children and Orphans Fund (DCOF).

Download the PDF to find out how ASF generated new learning in an under-served arena of development: the role of non-formal education and apprenticeships in alleviating poverty.

As published online at http://microlinks.kdid.org/library/strive-success-story-apprentices-learn-and-earn-afghanistan