Welcome to Addis – Why I am here?


Why am I in Addis Ababa? Good question – sometimes I ask myself the same thing, just because I am no where near fully adjusted to calling this city home for the next six months (or 24 weeks – yes, I am keeping count).

Pictured left: A view of Addis from our hotelIt all started with an application to an internship I heard about through university. This application was followed by two interviews – the second of which I totally thought I botched. I guess my interviews weren’t epic fails as to my very pleasant surprise I ended up getting the internship as a business development intern with MEDA (Mennonite Economic Development Associates) for six months in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. After a week of orientation in Waterloo, Ontario (where MEDA’s head quarters are) and a month filled with a mix of emotions.. anxiety, pure panic and excitement to name a few.. I was on a 13-hour flight from Toronto to Addis!I’ll briefly explain the projects MEDA is working on in Ethiopia. MEDA is currently working on two projects in the country, which are being jointly funded by MEDA and donor partners.The first project, EDGET (Ethiopians Driving Growth, Entrepreneurship and Trade), is working with two crucial value chains in the country – rice and textiles – with the ultimate objection being to increase household income by 50% for 10,000 families over the next four years. To accomplish this, MEDA will facilitate the improvement of client household’s capacity to access the domestic markets for their goods. This will be accomplished through an enhancement of production techniques, appropriate technologies as well as several support services.The second project, E-FACE (Ethiopians Fighting Against Child Exploitation), is a joint partnership with World Vision Ethiopia to reduce child labor in the country. E-FACE will target 20,000 youth (17 and under) involved in exploitative working conditions and 7,000 vulnerable households in the country to improve both the incomes and overall livelihoods of these families and youth. MEDA’s role in E-FACE will directly target 3,250 youth (between 14 and 17 years old) while World Vision will target 16,750 children (between 5 and 13 years old). MEDA will also focus its efforts on reaching 7,000 families involved in the E-FACE project and facilitate their improved access to textile and agricultural markets in the country.Overall, I am very excited to be a part of MEDA’s work in Ethiopia, even if my time here will be brief.

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Packing for Addis Ababa, Ethiopia


It’s under a day now until my departure to Addis Ababa. My goal had been to “frontload” my packing for fear of any unwanted popups. I believe I’ve done a semi-successful time of planning ahead. I have moved some times before – to London (Ontario) or Vienna – but preparing for Addis Ababa has its own set of challenges. Entering a developing African country typically means bringing everything with you that you would miss. With that being said, you can probably find the majority of actual necessities in-country. The issue only arises once we have to answer the question: what is a necessity?So below you will find an extensive list of what I decided to bring. Perhaps this could be of use to future travelers on work placements in Addis Ababa, or a similar developing city with a high-altitude climate. Here it goes!Important Documents- Travel Immunization Record- Extra different sized passport photos (6)- Proof of graduation (work permit purposes)- Photo copies of passport, atm/visa cards, birth certificate, sin card, provincial health card, student card, vaccination record- Bank, health insurance & emergency contact information- Reminder cards. Since I have not earned the habit of eating safely in a developing country, I created reminder cards to store in my purse summarizing some key statements.- Flight tickets- Passport- Select photos of family and friends- US$Technology- Camera, memory card reader, extra memory card- Computer- Video camera, DV tapes (5) + cleaning tape- External Hard drives (3)- Wristwatch with alarm- Chargers- Adapters (Europlug 2-prong + India/Asia 3-prong) this was a bit of a headache- Surge Protector- eReader- Ethernet Cord- Mp3 player & headphonesGear- Mosquito Net (permethrin soaked nets, advised as extremely effective, are not available in Canada)- Bed sheet- Towel- Microfiber towel- Umbrella- Hand sanitizer (2)- Water purification drops- Emergency blanket- Mosquito Repellent 30% DEET- Flashlight- Moist wipes- First Aid Kit (assorted bandaids, blister bandaids, tweezers, alcohol pads, polysporin, waterproof matches, clotrimazole topical cream, surgical gloves, adhesive tape, scissors)- Diarrhea Kit (chicken & beef bouillon, immodium, pepto bismol, gastrolyte, gravol, cipro)- Laundry Kit (Woolite detergent travel packs, clothes line, sink plug – I’d recommend Austin House, tide to go, laundry bag)- Kleenex- Swimsuit- Sunglasses- Sunscreen- Scissors- Pencil Case- Double sided tape- Bandana (for lengthy dusty travel)- Paperback books (I brought…Richard Dowden’s Africa, Amharic Phrasebook, a book borrowed from a friend – Mere Christianity, C.S. Lewis, and a title I sourced in a Veinnese bookshop History of Ethiopia, Paul Henze. And of course, the much-loved Bradt guide on Ethiopia, Philip Briggs)- Map of Ethiopia- Blank small notepads- One checked bag, one 45L carry-on backpack (I love MEC)Personal Hygiene- Facial wipes, eye makeup remover pads- Hairdryer- Personal medications (advil, caltrate, vitamin D)- Contacts, solution, eye drops- Lip balm- Razors- Toothpaste- Preventative blister balm- Favourite shampoo, conditioner, leave-in conditioner- Face cream, cleanser- Sanitary napkinsFood- Parmesan cheese: I’m not sure if this one is allowed but I’m going to claim it and see.- Peanut butter (750g of Skippy is a true necessity for me!)- Favourite Teas & Hot chocolate- Lindt chocolate bars: I read a blog that the chocolate wasn’t very good so just in case I get that craving- Spices (cumin, mustard, cinnamon, basil, thyme, oregano, salt&pepper)- Sriracha hot sauce – only my staple ingredient in every dinner- Soy sauce- Protein bars (Cliff & Luna brand are great)- Baking powder- Almonds- Travel mug: required for my coffee before work every morningClothingConsidering that most Ethiopians dress conservatively, I erred on the side of long-sleeve tops, pants and loose lightweight clothing.- Variety of work-appropriate collared shirts (preference to long-sleeves)- Basic tank tops for layering and casual cotton long-sleeve tops- Slacks (3), capris , long shorts (2) and a pair of jeans- Long skirt, pencil skirt, knee-length dress- Cardigans (4), sweaters (4) and blazer (1)- Footwear: boots, open-toe sandals, black pumps, tan flats, running shoes, walking shoes and flip flops- Rain jacket, leather jacket- Scarves (3), tights and leggings- Gym strip (3)This list may have been excessively exhaustive in the depth of information I provided. At the very least, it highlights what I perceive I need versus what many other people may require elsewhere.

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The Void

“The Void”- That’s the term my sister uses to describe the time of life that I am in. ”The Void” is this tricky time right after you graduate college and suddenly your future is completely open. It is an exciting time and a scarey time. It is also a time of questions, question like:What do I really want to do with my life? Where do I want to live? Do I move to be near friends or a job? Now wait, what are my life values? How do these values shape how I live and work? What am I really passionate about? How do I even go about finding a job? How do I afford to pay off my debt and still manage to eat? How do I find a place to live and people to live with? What should I be pursuing? How do I figure this all out? How do I weigh the decisions between my dreams of adventure and what reality presents me with?My journey hasn’t been easy. Its been invigorating at times and quite dark at times. It feels like I am in the middle of the ocean struggling just to stay above water. But, even if I manged to get above the waves, I would still be lost in the open ocean.All that to say, this MEDA internship is a lifeboat in the open ocean of life. It is a chance to explore and define my interests and passions. It is an opportunity to learn from my co-workers and the projects they are involved. It is a chance to work for something greater than myself. And that, in and of itself, is truely life giving. Thank you MEDA.

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Primer mes in Lima, Peru - First Impressions



CLOUDY. There is no sight of the sun..ANYWHERE!! During this past month, I have only seen the sun 3 times in total. There is a blanket of clouds that extends across the Lima skies during the winter time. The cloudy skies have even made an impression on Herman Melville, the author of Moby Dick, who referred to Lima as, "the saddest city on earth."Pictured left: View from my bedroom -- This is what Lima looks at 9am, at noon and at 5pm.I would not go to the extent to calling it the saddest city, however not seeing the sun has been THE hardest adjustment thus far. Some Peruvians have reassured me that spring should be just around the corner. TECHNO-LINKS. I am currently working as the value chain development intern supporting MEDA's (Mennonite Economic Development Associates) Techno-Links project. In a nutshell, Techno-Links is a competitive matching grant fund promoting and expanding the access of agricultural technologies for small-size producers in Peru and Nicaragua. It is an exciting and busy time for us here in Lima, as the 16 winners of the grants will be announced shortly!Pictured right: My cozy office at the Techno-Links office in PeruDid I mention that I live in the same building as the office? Just 5 floors away! It makes a huge difference, especially those working days that go from 9 am to 7ish.SECURITY. Another advantage is security. I do not have to take public transportation carrying my laptop and allows me to stay a bit later at work, when needed. However, one should not be too confident. Last week, I had a minor security incident. After work, a security guard followed me to my apartment and began an extremely inappropriate conversation. Thankfully, I received full support and guidance from the MEDA staff and the appropriate actions were taken in response.I share this story because I want to encourage all my fellow intern colleagues to please report any security incident, even as small as you may considered it to be. As Jennifer (MEDA HR) told me, even if you are physically OK, any incident could also have a psychological impact. As a result, if something happens to you, please talk to someone about it.

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What is it that you do, exactly?


I think everyone in international development has been asked that question, and almost everyone dreads it! People have an idea of aid work as handing out rations to starving children (usually the ones in those old school Sally Struthers commercials) while wearing khaki. The truth is, though, that there are a ton of different paths you can take in development. The one I've chosen is monitoring and evaluation, and the internship I'm currently doing is in impact assessment.Impact assessment is exactly what it sounds like: A way to evaluate whether a program is working as intended. It's part of the "Monitoring & Evaluation" (M&E) (and sometimes "Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning") umbrella. Though some development firms only include M&E as required by the terms of reference in their government contracts, many are moving toward more rigorous in-house methods in order to track and improve program effects. (Since the 2008 recession, government agencies like CIDA, DFID, and USAID are also requiring better M&E from bidders on grants and contracts, since M&E can improve program efficiency.)How can you tell if something's working? Well, in my case, data analysis is an essential part of impact assessment. The project I'm working on right now is an evaluation study of MEDA Maroc's training programs. These programs - most notably the 100 Hours to Success training course - are meant to improve youth access to financial services. In September last year, about a year into the program, they gave surveys to clients who had participated in training programs, asking about a range of topics the programs had covered, such as savings, loans, and employment. They also asked about how the clients and their families had changed in the last year; for example, had they bought a refrigerator? A car? Had their monthly household income increased? This kind of data, can tell us a lot about possible program effects.A lot of it is descriptive statistics - anyone who's ever taken a research method course knows the drill on that one! But you have to be smart about what you run; you can't just describe a couple of variables and get useful information. One of MEDA's particular focuses, for example, is gender; when you ask, "What did people think about this program?", you also want to know, "What did girls think about this program?" and, "Compared to boys, how did girls perceive this factor?" You want to know what girls in urban areas thought versus girls in rural areas; you want to disaggregate the data as much as possible so that you know as much as possible. Part of data analysis is turning over rocks in the data set, looking for results that are unexpected or interesting.(If you're super nerdy, like me, that's the fun part. Other than making beautiful graphs in Excel.)Numbers can tell you a lot, but you also need the other side of the coin - qualitative data in the form of open-ended questions, focus groups, and case studies. It's really important to get as much depth as possible; although I believe in the power of quantitative data for giving a big-picture overview of a population, I also think that letting clients speak for themselves, and offer suggestions and solutions that work for their lives, is an integral part of delivering sustainable development solutions. Mistakes aren't always as clean-cut as delivering spoiled food to a refugee population; sometimes, experience shows us that minor tweaks or additions can have a lasting impact on program effectiveness.Anyway, that's a little bit about my job! When we talk about statistics, just remember that they're only as good as the person doing them.Until next time...

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Introducing the 2012 MEDA Interns


Welcome to MEDA's Intern Blog!This fall, 14 new interns joined MEDA to take part in an international development internship. Working in a variety of capacities and countries, each intern will be helping MEDA fulfill its mission of creating business solutions to poverty. Over the next 6 months, you will read about our experiences, learn our stories, and discover with us what it is like working in international development overseas. All of us come from different backgrounds and have different life experiences; how we react and learn from our work experience will be different. Why we chose to apply for our MEDA internships is different, yet we all hope to grow from the opportunity ahead of us.

So now the time comes to introduce the 2012 MEDA Interns...Adrien Friesen – Impact Assessment Intern, Market Linkages, NicaraguaAlan Kuurstra – I.T. Development Intern, Market Linkages, TanzaniaCaitlin MacDougall – Communication Development Intern, Financial Services, MoroccoDevon Krainer – Rural Microfinance Intern, Market Linkages, EthiopiaJaclyn Stief - Fundraising/Marketing, Marketing & Engagement, CanadaJennifer Ferreri – Rural Microfinance Intern, Financial Services, ZambiaKatherine Arblaster – Rural Microfinance Intern, Financial Services, NicaraguaKathryn Wyatt – Business Development Advisor, Market Linkages, EthiopiaLauren Brander – Impact Assessment Intern, Financial Services, MoroccoMarie Ang – Impact Assessment Intern, Market Linkages, TanzaniaMeghan Denega – Impact Assessment Intern, Market Linkages, UkraineMonica Rodriguez – Value Chain Development Intern, Market Linkages, PeruOla Mirzoeva – Value Chain Development Intern, Market Linkages, UkraineStephanie Shenk – Project Coordinator Intern, Market Linkages, United States

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