MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

What can we learn from Project Evaluations? MEDA Shares Results of Impact Evaluation

IE1
EI2
EI3
EI4

From 2008 to 2014, MEDA implemented the YouthInvest project in Morocco and Egypt.  During that time, we reached over 63,000 youth with financial and non-financial services, and built the capacity of our partner staff to provide skills training and financial products to youth.

But this is not the whole story.

Continue reading
1345 Hits

Usage and Dormancy of Youth Accounts

This blog originally appeared on The SEEP Network Blog, co-authored by Jennifer Denomy and Rebecca Hession.

The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24, with 89 percent of them residing in less-developed countries (2014). With appropriate knowledge and tools, youth can be financially empowered to access economic opportunities in a sustainable manner. Although they represent a large potential market, the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries. In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area, the SEEP Network’s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs. The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015.

Continue reading
7837 Hits

Assessing Youth Financial Needs in Cross River State

youlead
other services products
standards of living satisfaction by fender

MEDA is partnering with Cuso International to improve financial inclusion for youth in Nigeria. The project titled Youth Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Access and Development (YouLead) works with young women and men in Cross River State, Nigeria.Following MEDA's detailed institutional assessment of financial sector in Cross River State, five financial inclusion partners were selected for capacity building support. Subsequently, an assessment of Youth Financial Needs was undertaken in May-June 2015. This blog documents the key findings of this assessment.

Why was the assessment needed?

Continue reading
2535 Hits

Can MEDA’s Approach Reduce Child, Early and Forced Marriage?

earlychildhoodmariage diagram

There are nearly 70 million child brides worldwide and if current trends continue, 142 million more will join them in the coming decade.1 Married adolescent girls are among the most vulnerable groups in society. They face numerous risks, including early pregnancy, higher maternal mortality and heightened risk of domestic violence and sexually transmitted disease. Their future potential and that of their community and nation, are cut short.

Early and forced marriage usually marks the end of a girl’s education, diminishing her long-term opportunities and sentencing her and her children to lifelong hardships. Often isolated to the domestic sphere, married girls may be able to engage in income generating activity, but will have no control over their income, no awareness of market systems, and no buffer for weathering economic shocks.

Continue reading
2992 Hits

Financial Inclusion for Nigerian Youth

MAP Nigeria Cross River
CUSO Youth
CUSO
The start of something new, something based on MEDA's experiences in Morocco

MEDA recently launched its partnership with CUSO International to improve financial inclusion for youth in Nigeria. The project titled Youth Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Access and Development (YouLead) will work with young women and men in Cross River State, Nigeria.

Nigeria is Africa's most populous country and the unemployment rate stands at approximately 20%, with youth unemployment at almost double this rate at 35%.

Continue reading
4957 Hits

Why access to financial services can open doors for young entrepreneurs

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Youth-loan-experiences.PNG

I was invited to speak briefly at Chemonics last week on what I thought was an important component to support youth enterprise development. As one of MEDA's core areas of experience, I decided to talk about providing access to appropriate financial services for youth. Here's why I think this is one crucial component to enable youth enterprise development...

Global youth dominate the ranks of the unemployed. Demographic challenges, gender barriers, education or skill mismatch, and unsafe or poorly paid work are among the many difficulties that youth face in the search for economic opportunities. This is something we saw clearly illustrated in the Arab Spring. Compounding these challenges, entrepreneurial youth typically have limited access to financial services that meet their business development needs – this can be because their loan requests are often small and too costly for Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) to administer.

Continue reading
5705 Hits

Economic Strengthening: Building Assets for Vulnerable Youth in Afghanistan

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_ASF-apprentices-2.jpg
b2ap3_thumbnail_indirect-vs-direct-v2.png
a1sx2_Thumbnail1_ASF-apprentices-at-work.jpg

From 2008 to 2011, MEDA implemented the Afghan Secure Futures project (ASF) in Kabul. ASF focused on improving the lives of as many as 1,000 vulnerable boys, mainly between the ages of 14 and 18, who were living in Kabul and working as apprentices in the construction sector.

Why take an indirect approach?

Many economic strengthening (ES) projects use indirect approaches. Some seek to benefit youth through one of the social units to which they belong, such as their family1. Family-focused projects typically focus on increasing the earnings of children's parents with the assumption that this will be partly spent to benefit children. Seeking to benefit children and younger youth through their workplaces is less common among ES programming.

Continue reading
6621 Hits

One Workplace At A Time

a1sx2_Original4_2014-10-10-06.54.52.jpg
a1sx2_Thumbnail1_OSH-Diagram-EFACE.png
An Overview of MEDA's Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Intervention for Working Youth in Ethiopia

A little under one-third of Ethiopia's population is currently living in extreme poverty[1]. In many of these cases, households withdraw their children from school and put them to work in order to supplement the family income. While the government of Ethiopia has made great effort to element the worst forms of child labor, enforcement of laws and consistent prosecution of violators has not yet reached an ideal level.

To address this gap, MEDA's E-FACE project implements various livelihood strengthening interventions that tackle the issue of child exploitation due to reduced livelihood. E-FACE targets households at-risk of or engaged in the worst forms of child labor in the Ethiopian textile and agriculture sectors, as well as young workers under the age of 18[2].

Continue reading
4219 Hits

Looking Ahead: The Future of Economic Strengthening

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Building-Skills-for-Life-Diagram.png
a1sx2_Thumbnail1_youth-worker-ethiopia.jpg
This blog series was sent courtesy of Microlinks, part of the Feed the Future Knowledge-Driven Agricultural Development project. Its contents were produced under United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-LA-13-00001. The contents are the responsibility of FHI 360 and its partner, the International Rescue Committee, and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States GovernmentPromising Practices

In 2008, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) defined economic strengthening (ES) as "[t]he portfolio of strategies and interventions that supply, protect, and/or grow physical, natural, financial, human, and social assets aimed at improving vulnerable households cope [sic] with the exogenous shocks they face and improve their economic resilience to future shocks." That is a tall order; however, we are seeing an increasing demand for holistic programming to respond to the needs of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). A growing body of evidence points to risky behavior by orphans and vulnerable children seeking to meet immediate livelihood needs, such as accepting "gifts" from older males in return for sexual favors and migration.

Here, we can begin to understand what the problem is. We know there is a call for an innovative "portfolio of strategies and interventions" aimed at improving vulnerable households' ability to cope with shocks, but what are they? What evidence is there to prove that ES models and approaches even work? Well, the jury is still out; however, we will explore a few areas that have seen promising practices for OVC and where these ES trends may take programming in the future.

Continue reading
4515 Hits

To Partner or Not to Partner When Implementing Youth Financial Programs

Forging the right partnerships between Financial Service Providers (FSPs), Youth Serving Organizations (YSOs), and other key stakeholders, such as schools and local government, can be a key factor to successfully and sustainably serving youth clients.However, partnerships are not always the answer.This blog explores whether or not to partner, as well as the nature of partnerships themselves, and is targeted to FSPs and YSOs, which deliver youth savings programs.

By Nicki Post and Ryan Newton (Women's World Banking)

Continue reading
4896 Hits

Looking Back and Leaning Forward

Jen-and-Farah-present-convention-seminar_20150107-163020_1.jpg
E-FACE-youth-weaver.jpg
Nigeria-youth.jpg

MEDA's Youth team are learning from their past work and applying it to MEDA's new youth projects. Director of Youth Economic Opportunities, Jennifer Denomy, and senior project manager, Farah Chandani, presented at MEDA's annual convention, held Nov 6-9 in Winnipeg, MB.

The term "youth" can encompass many different ages depending on who's defining it, though MEDA typically works with those 15-24 years old. Youth are also labelled the "demographic dividend" – so many are coming of age simultaneously and with this increase of youth entering the workforce, access to employment becomes a problem.

Continue reading
3958 Hits

Why Include Life Skills in Youth Programming?

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_youth-twitter-banner-1.jpg
a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Building-Skills-for-Life-Diagram.png
Empowering Youth: Building Skills For Life for Youth in Ethiopa

Building Skills for Life is a training program tailored for young workers (ages 14 -17) in Ethiopia. It is one aspect of a multi-pronged approach to supporting youth in the E-FACE project (Ethiopians Fighting Against Child Exploitation).

The program is based on MEDA's previous experiences with providing life skills and financial literacy training for youth in Morocco and Egypt through the YouthInvest project. The training encourages young people to understand themselves, to develop decision-making capacity, and improve their communication skills – in order to develop the required business skills to become entrepreneurs. It is designed to empower youth and to help them create further opportunities for their lives. In Ethiopia, the training is focussed on young weavers in the textile industry; hence a practical aspect that provides technical training and know-how on weaving techniques is also included. The diagram below illustrates the six core areas covered by the 100-hour training program.

Continue reading
5868 Hits