MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

Up to Coquihalla Summit

The bike ride started on May 18th, at Mile 0 in Victoria British Columbia, where the Terry Fox monument is located. Starting off here is a beautiful location with the Pacific Ocean in the background. Our small "possy" did the trick of boosting the atmosphere. They included a couple I had met in Nicaragua; Mary's parents, Abe and Lisa; the Rotarian President in Victoria; Ethan Eshbach, MEDA's Young Adult Engagement Coordinator; our hosts, whom we had just met, and our hosts' parents. They sent us off with a warm departure.

The bicycle route to cross from Vancouver Island into the Tsawwassen Harbour is easily accessible by the Lochside Trail. Once in Delta, BC, we were fortunate enough to have Ethan follow us and be our support vehicle for a week. His last stop with us was in Hope, which was also our first day of cycling 100km. We hadn't quite hit the Rockies yet – thus, we weren't prepared for the following day.

Coquihalla Summit is highway 5, or the Coquihalla Highway. It's the highest point on the highway between the cities of Hope and Merritt, which is an altitude of 1,244m or 4,081ft. To be honest, we were underprepared for this undertaking. The climb is 15km, so being us, we thought no problem. The day of the trip didn't start till noon since we had a flat tire. We finished just as the sun was setting, putting in about 8 hours that day. The ride was extremely tolling on our mental and physical stamina. At one point, I was crying and I was tired of transport trucks slowly pulling beside us. I then looked back and saw the gorgeous snow covered mountain peaks. I sound corny, but I realized how truly blessed I was at that point: That my biggest problem IN MY LIFE at that moment was getting up that mountain. In reality, I'm the luckiest person to be able to see this country.

We were searching for the recreational area for camping, but it was hard to find. We saw a tow truck pulled over and asked how far it was away while on the summit. He made a horrible joke, "Still 100 miles away." Remember how I said we weren't prepared? By this time, we had run out of water. I asked the driver when the next service station was. He went into his car and gave us six water bottles. The campground was only 2km away, but after thinking 15km would be easy for a climb, we were dreading the last 2km.

When we got to the campground, the sun was already setting behind a mountain. To get to the campground you need to hike a few more kilometers. Needless to say, we were tired. We set up our tent right in the parking lot and had a campfire there.

I am proud that I was able to pass the Coquihalla Summit. The running joke is.."Is it as big as Coquihalla Summit? No problem."

Tent poles
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