MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

The Summits and the Wind

We hit a milestone two days ago when we reached the British Columbia and Alberta border. To reach this goal, we had one last summit to climb.

We like being mentally prepared – we always ask people how the summits are and what the elevation levels will be like. For example, will we have gradual climbs, steep climbs, or rollercoaster hills? Could it all be flat (not likely)? Usually, people warned us about large climbs that would take us most of the day, Coquihalla Summit being one of them.

In total, we had three summits. Don't get me wrong, most days in the Rockies were a struggle, but at the end we always reached our goal and were on time with our schedule. Once we got to our location, we were filled with happiness and we always appreciate the beauty of the surrounding area. There is something about manpower and sweat that makes the end goal that much more awarding. Out of the three summits, we didn't hit our last one until our last day in BC, coming out of Fernie.

Crowsnest Pass Summit is a mountain pass across the Continental Divide of the Canadian Rockies on the Alberta/British Columbia border. The elevation of Crowsnest is 1, 358 meters. Everyday we try to be mentally prepared for the toughest day. We were also not avid cyclists beforehand (even though we trained for a year), thus some climbs and routes are harder for us sometimes. It also helps to be prepared so that you're not disappointed when you see a 7km, 15km, or 30km climb ahead of you that could take you 4 hours. Each summit limit has a description with the name of the mountain and the elevation level. This is when we know we've done the hardest work there is to do in the day and then we can celebrate.

We crossed the Crowsnest Pass and then 2km later we were in Alberta. I didn't believe that that was it and we were done. Either the climb wasn't hard, or we have become stronger and have dealt with a lot harder climbs. I think it's a combination of everything. This is a large milestone for us – we learned how to cycle in the Rockies.

Now we are happy we are in the Praries where the terrain is a lot easier, however we have a new challenge. Someone in Alberta told us a joke that "everyone walks sideways here." They were referring to the wind. Our first day in Alberta, yesterday, coming into Lethbridge, had 22km winds against us. Lethbridge is known for being one of the windiest cities. We cycled 99km into Lethbridge from Pincher Creek, just outside the BC border in Alberta. I struggled a lot mentally and physically too. I'm not use to the wind and cycling continuously, at least in the Rockies we had a 20km break when we went down the mountains. Alberta and Saskcatchewan will be a new challenge, but I look forward to the new scenery and continuing to meet new people.

One province down, nine to go!

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