MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

E-FACE Site Visit in Addis Ababa

b2ap3_thumbnail_An-intricate-weaving-design-that-one-of-E-FACEs-youth-is-working-on.gifI had the pleasant surprise of being able to join our team on today's site visits, which included various interventions such as: Business Owners (BOs) and Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA), Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET), and Building Skills for Life. The day started out driving across the city to an area called Shiro Meda where we visited the first intervention of BOs and VSLA. The youth representatives seemed to get a kick out of seeing me there – I'm guessing they weren't expecting me to be there. While I didn't understand most of the conversations, my colleague, Tsedey translated what one of the youth shared: she spoke about the valuable lessons and training received in the area of saving. Through their weekly savings, the youth gain capacity to purchase their own notebooks – something I wouldn't even have to think twice about back at home.

Our second visit was to a TVET site, where youth received training at a hair salon school. When I entered the building, the youth were busy working away at doing people's hair. It was interesting to see a fair amount of males receiving this training, whereas at most hair schools in Canada, the students are mostly female.

My highlight of the entire day was the last site. We drove down a very bumpy road to a government work space, where youth participants in the Building Skills for Life program were working with weaving looms. Building Skills for Life targets young workers (ages 14-17) and provides them with practical education and training, so that the youth can be empowered to create opportunities for themselves. The program also includes technical training on traditional weaving, which is what I was able to see for myself through the visit. The youth seemed pretty shy as I went around with my camera, but once I started getting a few shots, some of the youth seemed to be alright with me taking pictures of their work. Some of the pieces were very intricate, and it amazes me that they learn and develop these skills in order to make a living for themselves at such a young age.

I'm thankful I had the opportunity to join today's site visits. It really brought the past few weeks of what I've been working on in the office to life. It's one thing when you see E-FACE numbers, reports, and documents. It was refreshing to see the clients and get a better understanding of how this project is really impacting lives, especially those in the textile industry. Of course I still have so much to learn and grasp about the project and overall child labor in Ethiopia (especially in traditional weaving), which makes me even more eager to get out into the field and to the sites.

In the future, I'll be traveling to Arba Minch to see E-FACE's field work and interventions. I'm really excited to see a different part of Ethiopia, and look forward to meeting more clients.

Morning Runs, Red Red and Lovely People
One month down, five more to go

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