MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

Arrival in Addis Ababa

b2ap3_thumbnail_View-of-Addis-from-the-office.gifTwo months ago I had no idea what my next step was going to be as a new professional in international development, not alone what part of the world I was going to end up in! It only really hit me once we landed. All I could see outside the airplane window was large green rolling hills. I knew then that I had definitely left Toronto! I was so relieved that we had arrived safely and was very eager to get off of the plane as I had been sitting for 13.5 hours straight!

After exiting the airport, I felt like I was in a completely different world. One thing I automatically noticed is the drastic difference in wealth among the people. Ethiopia has a population of approximately 94 million, making it the most populous landlocked country. Ethiopia is also one of the world's poorest nations. According to the UNDP's 2013 human development index, Ethiopia ranks 173 out of 187 countries and 40% of its population lives on less than US $1.25 a day. Roads are shared with livestock and due to the fast growing economy there is construction in every possible direction. It was especially busy the day we arrived because it was the day before Ethiopian New Year. Even though it is a very busy city, I consider Addis to be very beautiful. There are lush palm trees and when the clouds clear, the view of the hills is beautiful.

Once we arrived at our house our lovely landlady, Tsedey had a coffee ceremony for us. I knew that coffee is a staple in Ethiopia but what I did not know is that the coffee ceremony is an integral part of Ethiopian social and cultural life. b2ap3_thumbnail_The-coffee-ceremony.gifAn invitation to a ceremony is considered a mark of friendship and represents great hospitality. The process consisted of roasting the coffee beans over a tiny charcoal stove, with incense burning. Tsedey then took the beans and let us smell them from the stove before grinding them with a pestle and mortar. After, the grounded coffee beans were put in a special boiling pot called a jebena that strains and boils the coffee and water. Once the coffee was ready, Tsedey served it to us with homemade popcorn (which I later realized is a common part of the coffee ceremony). Some coffee ceremonies may be slightly different from the one I experienced but for the most part, they follow similar steps. One thing is certain, Ethiopian coffee is fantastic!

It is a lot cooler here than I expected. September is still considered to be a part of the rainy season so it rains on and off daily while also dropping in temperature, especially at night. In the evening of the day we arrived, the other intern Clara and I woke up freezing and with no electricity (also common). So we had to improvise and make oatmeal over a gas stove and eat it out of mugs while huddled in our blankets. Our first day in Ethiopia was definitely an adventure, to say the least!b2ap3_thumbnail_Ethiopian-coffee-and-Popcorn.gif

When I applied for the Communication and Program Support Intern position for MEDA's EDGET program, I had no idea that I would be where I am today. I am very pleasantly surprised that I was offered the position! I am very excited to start this new chapter of my life and to be a part of the amazing work MEDA does. I am truly passionate about working towards sustainable development, creating hope and giving people the skills, resources and opportunities to create positive change for themselves. I hope to not only develop my professional skills but also take this time to reflect on my personal development and growth. This will be one whirlwind of an experience and while it may not be all sunshine and roses, I will give my all and take everything in.
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