MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

Afriroots Dar Tour

b2ap3_thumbnail_Checking-out-the-Askari-Monument-in-central-Dar-near-Posta.pngAfriroots is a group that is working with local communities first hand in Dar Es Salaam, so traveling with them is direct community benefiting tourism. They are giving back to places they visit. I have had the privilege of taking two different tours they offer. The 'Biking Tour of Tandale, Sinza' (twice) as well as a city centre 'Historical Walking Tour'. On the historic tour we visited government sites, churches, mosques and the memorial for the Askari soldiers who fought in the British Carrier Corps in World War I, as well as the New African Hotel where Malcolm X visited while in Dar, and the Ocean Road Cancer Institute where medical discoveries were made.

On the biking tours you visit a formal market area designed by the government to try and clean up the markets, which is barely used and underutilized as it's often in a terrible location or away from the street or main roads. Also you visit an informal market area where it is very busy with people selling every fruit and vegetable imaginable from small stalls bordering the side of the busy roadway. It also has a clothing market area attached to it whereby men have piles of clothing available at their stalls. Some have piles of shoes (sometimes not even in pairs), other may have loads of jeans or t-shirts. They buy the bundles in bulk off of ships from other parts of the world and then distribute the items to whoever will buy them. The market sellers know where the customers are and don't want to move the businesses to an area that isn't busy with passing buyers and foot traffic.

b2ap3_thumbnail_My-family-and-tour-guides-enjoying-our-chapatti-and-chai-tea--mid-bike-tour.pngb2ap3_thumbnail_The-portable-hot-coffee-transporter-and-the-peanut-brittle-being-made-in-the-background.pngOther areas we experienced were a traditional coffee stop where young men were getting ready for the day making Swahili coast coffee, crushing the beans and mixing with boiling water. They have made a contraption that is used to transport coffee around the city while they walk the streets for a few hours selling their coffee. The steel pot keeps the kahawa (coffee) hot and has a holder so it doesn't burn the hand of the carrier. To go along with the kahawa is a sweet brittle type peanut bar, which most people eat with their coffee. You will often see these guys walking around in the morning or at night with their signature steel pots. The tour takes the back roads to these spots with vibrant community and street life keeping the 'Bongo' city in motion.

The next location we visited was mama's small chapatti and chai tea shop in the Mwananyamala area. She used to live across the street from her location but was forced out of it years ago. Some friends have since helped her get a small steel shelter area where she has a seating area to serve customers for the morning breakfast of chapatti and chai, a common breakfast staples in the Swahili coast. My own mom even tried to pika (cook) some chapatti herself, flattening it out and heating it up in the pan.

We continued biking to a traditional homestead of Tanganyika – this was mainland Tanzania's name before it merged with Zanzibar to become Tan–Zan-ia. Pre-dating independence from colonial rule in 1961, it is a called a wazaramo, from one of the first neighborhoods of Dar and the Bantu people. It had multiple large rooms where a whole family would sleep in.

After, we were off to a shop selling homemade remedies, and fixes. It had all kinds of old peanut butter jars full of different mixes and healing powders. A few examples were leaves mixed together to produce a beauty cream formula, and a treatment for mosquito bites. As well as a few bottles, some of which had a love potion.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Some-of-the-many-different-kitenge-and-kangas.pngb2ap3_thumbnail_Inside-the-Mwananyamala-movie-theatre.pngAcross the street from this location was a typical kitenge or kanga shop where they were selling the many different colours and patterns of cloth. The difference between a Zanzibar kitenge and a mainland one is by the saying. The Zanzibarian ones are more thrash and talking about revolution. Often women won't even look at the colours of the material or border pattern and will buy the item based on what the saying is. Most are message about good life secrets and religion, almost like a Swahili fortune cookie saying. The kitenge is a larger piece of fabric used for sewing dresses and is either worn like kangas (wrapped around women's hips) or brought to a tailor.

The next stop was a small theatre where watoto (children) would frequent on weekends. At this location they can pay a small coin price (a few hundred Tshillings) to see a new movie, DVD, a favourite cartoon or Swahili feature. In a tin shack, a small colour TV is placed in front of multiple benches where lots of kids sit having a good time.

We then went through one of the lowest income areas in the city of Dar Es Salaam called Tandale and yet the people are quite humble. This area has informal settlements where they face multiple challenges in areas like sanitation, wastewater management and infrastructure.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Walking-over-the-bridge-in-Tandale-which-is-in-need-of-repair-after-heavy-rains.pngTb2ap3_thumbnail_Purse-and-floormat-goods-made-by-the-women-in-Tandale.pnghey live close to a very polluted river that runs through the city. During heavy rainy season, the area where hundreds of people pass every day will often be flooded and impassable. With the help of the AfriRoots tours they were able to replace the makeshift log bridge with a concrete structure to help people, bajaji vehicles, wagons etc. crossing the busy area. However during the recent short rains, the bridge foundations had shifted in the river and the bridge is broken again.

More money needs to be invested to build a better more stable bridge with better footings able to withstand the wrath of the river. Next to this area are a few families and groups who are selling recycled items. The one lady has taken old and discarded material scrapes from fabric shops and put them together with a zipper to make a purse, as well as welcome mats made of the same material.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Some-of-the-Tandale-men-working-on-papier-mache-artwork-to-earn-an-income.pngOther men had found old wires and fixed them together in a frame to form different animals. Afterwards they would put paper and a mix of mud to cover the wires in a papier-mâché form. They also have their own community garden growing vegetables and plants, which are used to cure different diseases and health problems common to the areas residents. The area has village-based conservation and now sees an increase in sources of income due to the tours. Some very amazing progressive work is going on in here in one of the poorest parts of the city. It is a shame however the area often gets overlooked as inaccessible by the city government for building and health projects.

Afterwards we were off to Sinza, a middle-class income area of the city with a rising population in Dar. This area has smaller cheaper hotels and motels along with plenty of small shops and thriving businesses, housing plenty of hard working young Swahili and traditional Tanzania professionals who work in the city centre or other parts of the city. This is a part of Dar where rapid urbanization is taking place.

At the end we ended up back at busy Bagamoyo Road. This tour is highly recommended to see parts of the real Dar Es Salaam worth experiencing that are often hard to get to by the average foreigner. The guides are very knowledgeable, spoke great English while they taught us plenty of history and culture of the surrounding areas. On the tour you gain first hand experiences of the social issues facing Dar Es Salaam – living conditions of families, urbanization, infrastructure and the urban environment. You visit markets and meet the people who work and innovate in the informal economy, hearing about the everyday struggles they face.

A Muslim Nikah (wedding)
Cape Coast and Castles

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